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D10 - RADIO - Help, I don't understand what these swash plate types are all about ?

Many pilots have the same problem...

Basically there are two different commonly used types of swash plate system used by RC CP helicopters. The original method was/is called "mechanical" mixing, while the other is called "electronic" mixing.  These are even known as mCCPM and eCCPM.  The mechanical mixing uses a 90 degree swash plate arrangement for the servo connections, whilst CCPM uses 120 degree connections

  

When the radio is using CCPM (Cyclic Control Pitch Management), it has to have a swash plate with 120 degree separation of the connecting balls on the swash plate. (see right hand diagram above).

With CCPM, all of the swash plate servos (3 of them) work together in differing amounts to provide the required movement of the swash plate.  So for example to achieve a nose down  attitude, the Elevator servo pushes the front (or sometimes rear) of the swash plate in the relevant direction.  Meanwhile, the aileron (& pitch/aux1) servos move in the opposite direction to keep the centre of the swash plate at exactly the same point so that the pitch setting does not change.

With mechanical mixing (NON CCPM), each of the swash plate servos (3 of them) work totally independently to provide the required movement of the swash plate.  So for example to achieve a nose down attitude, the Elevator servo pushes the front (or sometimes rear) of the swash plate in the relevant direction.  The aileron (& pitch/aux1) servos DO NOT MAKE ANY movement at all, because the centre of the swash plate will still be at exactly the same point so that the pitch setting does not change because the aileron connector balls are at 90 degrees to the elevator connector.

Equally, with mechanical mixing, to bank left or right, only a single servo performs the movement. This servo is often connected to both of the swash plate connecting balls on each side of the swash plate for more precise control.

With CCPM, to enable "mixing" the operation of all the servos that attach to the swash plate all three servos have to do their own part to achieve the required movement of the swash plate.

So for pitch control (nose up/down) the two "aileron" servos have to operate in the SAME direction while the elevator goes in the opposite direction.  It is CCPM in the transmitter that handles the mixing needed to ensure that each servo works in conjunction with the others to achieve the required movement of the swash plate.

I HOPE THIS DESCRIPTION HELPS ... ?

 

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